Case Studies

The Not-So-Obvious Edge The Not-So-Obvious Edge

Rapid Response

The Not-So-Obvious Edge

Successful global financial firms are always looking for an edge. Having an edge in the market and over their competitors means they can improve performance and drive value for themselves and for their clients.

Rapid Response

The Not-So-Obvious Edge

Successful global financial firms are always looking for an edge. Having an edge in the market and over their competitors means they can improve performance and drive value for themselves and for their clients.

It’s why we enjoy working with them: Atlas’s team of expert analysts are constantly looking for newer, better, and untapped sources of news to deliver that edge. But sometimes that edge isn’t an obvious one, and that’s when our analysts’ true value is realized.

One of our largest clients trusts our analysts with advance notice of deals and announcements, allowing us to dynamically manage resources, and step up to a full war-footing to ensure absolutely nothing is missed during those crucial first few hours. But that always-on approach can pay dividends elsewhere. Our analysts were able to capture and flag the first rumblings of a large protest planned against our client. The client was unaware of the conversation—it hadn’t made its way to more mainstream outlets. But Atlas’s diligence meant our client was informed and could act with the speed and agility needed to neutralize coverage that would have proved quite damaging to their reputation and their bottom-line.

A not-so-obvious edge that proved rather necessary.

Rooting Out Fake News Rooting Out Fake News

Investigative Analysis

Rooting Out Fake News

The rise of fake news is one of the remarkable growth stories of the past decade. Just a few years ago, the phrase was meaningless. Today, according to multiple surveys, it is seen as a greater problem than climate change or terrorism.

Investigative Analysis

Rooting Out Fake News

The rise of fake news is one of the remarkable growth stories of the past decade. Just a few years ago, the phrase was meaningless. Today, according to multiple surveys, it is seen as a greater problem than climate change or terrorism.

But remarkable as that may seem, it’s not actually what’s most interesting. We all have deeply divergent views about fake news and different responses to it, which suggest that emphasis on misinformation could run the risk of making people even less well informed. More than making people believe false things, the rise of fake news is making it harder for people to see the truth.

That’s where our analysts can—and often do—play a critical role. For many of our clients, cutting through the noise of what’s real and what’s fake on social media can mean the difference between success and failure. Especially when rumors about a foreign leader are spread across social media, whether or not to trust the news and how and when to respond can impact closely guarded alliances.

That was the case for one of Atlas’s clients. Our team of analysts informed them of rumors about one of their regional allies and provided evidence that those propagating the rumors were, in fact, bogus actors. As a result, the client was able to help end the speculation and was seen as a true partner to the rumored ally.

Beating the News Beating the News

Speed and Agility

Beating the News

While it’s true the relentless news landscape of micro scoops can swallow up even the most reputable news organizations and journalists, for our clients those micro scoops are of huge importance. Even if its news that everyone will eventually find out about later, knowing the news before anyone else is as good as gold.

Speed and Agility

Beating the News

While it’s true the relentless news landscape of micro scoops can swallow up even the most reputable news organizations and journalists, for our clients those micro scoops are of huge importance. Even if its news that everyone will eventually find out about later, knowing the news before anyone else is as good as gold.

Our U.K. analysts know this well. Each of them spent years in and around Westminster, having become experts on the key players and having fully grasped the cadence and rhythms of Whitehall better than even the most seasoned MPs. As a result, they’re uniquely skilled at recognizing trends and making predictions. In fact, they’ve correctly predicted the departures of scores of government officials well in advance of the major news sources.

This ability to beat the news has proven beneficial to those who subscribe to our U.K. political dashboard. Like them, our team of analysts once combed through clip after clip churned out by algorithms to catch or keep an edge. Frustrated by the inefficiency, and bothered by all the moments that were missed, we knew there had to be a better way. That’s when we realized we didn’t need media monitoring; we needed a war room—we needed a smarter algorithm coupled with smart people.

That’s what speed and agility deliver: micro scoops that help our clients stay ahead of the news.